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New Jersey Women in World War II by Patricia Chappine: A Book Review

New Jersey Women in World War II
Author: Patricia Chappine
Genre: Nonfiction, History
Publisher: The History Press
Release Date: June 8, 2015
Pages: 144
Source: This book was given to me by the author in exchange for an honest review.
Synopsis: During World War II, New Jersey’s Women Answered The Call.

     Real-life Rosie the Riveters worked the lines in New Jerseys factories, such as those of General Motors Eastern Aircraft Division, while women on the vulnerable coast enforced blackout orders. Others sold war bonds, planted victory gardens and conserved materials for the war effort. Thousands more served as nurses and in branches of the armed forces like the Women's Army Corps and the U.S. Navy's Women Accepted for Volunteer Emergency Service. African American women fought a double war, one against the nations enemies and another against discrimination. Historian Patricia Chappine explores the pivotal roles that New Jersey women played in World War II.

     My review: During the Declaration of World War II, the Congress passed the Selective Service and Training Act, which required all men from the ages twenty-one to twenty-six to join the service. This left many opportunities for young women to help participate in different roles of the war that were once denied to them. Many women not only worked in defense industries, but some also joined the army and navy. Some even became nurses to help soldiers both in the U.S and overseas. Also, there was an organization made up of women pilots. In this book, it discusses how the women from New Jersey showed their patriotism by becoming involved in the war.

     While World War II was a troubled time for all, it did give women more opportunities than they had before. Women were now in charge of the household, and some of them even had to be breadwinners. Women were also given the opportunity to join the army and navy, which was unheard of at the time. However, it was not easy for the women to join the military. Because they were met with skepticism from the men, these women had to prove to them that they could do the jobs just as well as them. Each time they accomplished it, the tasks became much harder as it got along. When they passed all of it, they were then treated with respect and were acknowledged with equality.

     I also liked the chapter about the African American women joining the homefront. The African American women were very patriotic to a country who at the time treated them as second-class citizens. These women were not only fighting for World War II, but they also had to experience discrimination during their time of service. While they were allowed to join the army, they still faced segregation. The navy did not accept them to join until later, and the pilot organization never accepted them. While they faced many rejections and discrimination, they never gave up in participating in the war effort.

     Overall, New Jersey Women in World War II gives us a glimpse of the tremendous effort these women contributed in war. These women were strong, capable, and determined. They loved their country, and wanted to help in any way they could. This was a very comprehensive read, and very well-written. This book is a great tribute to these women that participated in the war effort and their accomplishments.

Rating: 5 out of 5 stars

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