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Queen of the Heavens by Kingsley Guy: A Book Review

Queen of the Heavens
Author: Kingsley Guy
Genre: Historical Fiction
Publisher: Middle River Press
Release Date: 2012
Pages: 284
Source: Personal Collection
Synopsis: What is it like to awaken to the divine, and know that our lives are informed and shaped by spiritual guidance from other realms? Queen of the Heavens helps us open the gateway to those unseen worlds.

     Respected journalist Kingsley Guy takes us back to ancient Egypt, where gods and goddesses were not merely images carved in stone. They were as real as the sunset and the wind blowing through papyrus reeds. Known as the neters, they passed back and forth between the dimensions, working magic in people's lives.
   
     Come meet Tuya. Through her gifts as a healer, this extraordinary woman gained the attention of the royal court and rose from commoner to queen. Tuya inspired and transformed the lives of those she touched during the Golden Age of the Pharaohs. Allow her to do the same for you. 

     My Review: Tuya was queen to Seti I and the mother of Ramesses II. Yet, she was once a commoner. How did a commoner become the Queen of Egypt? The historical novel, Queen of the Heavens attempts to answers these questions. At an early age, Tuya was marked by the Egyptian gods. Called by Isis herself, she will help restore light to Egypt. A devoted woman to the gods, Tuya is determined to do their will. Little does she know that she is called to be the Queen of Egypt and will give birth to one of Egypt’s greatest pharaohs.

     At first, Tuya is a precocious and happy child. Yet, when she is called by Isis, she makes a tough decision to do Isis’s will, even when her family objects. Her family does not understand Tuya’s actions and are befuddled by them. This is because Tuya has the gift of healing and she heals both nobles and commoners alike, which is very improper for a young girl of marriageable age. Yet, Tuya’s healing has captured the attention of Ramesses, who will eventually be Ramesses I. He believes that because of Tuya’s healing powers that she has the ear of Isis. This makes Tuya a very promising bride and marries her to his son, Seti.

     I really admire Tuya. She is a strong and bright woman. I liked how she followed Isis’s will to heal both commoners and nobles. Yet, sometimes Tuya suffered some obstacles. It is because of these difficulties that she questions her faith and her abilities. Eventually, she learns that faith involves both the good and the bad times. Because of this, it is what makes her a stronger and wiser person.

     Overall, this book is about faith, family, and choices. It is about a woman who is determined to follow her beliefs and do what is right. The message of this book is that even though there are difficult times in your life, you will overcome them. The obstacles in your life are what makes you a stronger person. I really thought this book was very well-researched, and I thought all the characters were very complex. The only thing I did not like about this book was the long separation between Seti and Tuya. I thought the reason for their separation was absurd and could easily be remedied. Still, I love how Queen Tuya is portrayed in the book because she is a very caring, tough, and wise character. I recommend this book to fans of Michelle Moran, Stephanie Dray, and Libbie Hawker. Queen of the Heavens is an excellent tribute to this obscure woman.

Rating: 4 out of 5 stars





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