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Diana: Her True Story in Her Own Words by Andrew Morton

Diana: Her True Story in Her Own Words
Author: Andrew Morton
Genre: Nonfiction, History, Biography, 
Publisher: Simon and Schuster
Release Date: 2009
Pages: 448
Source: My Personal Collection
Synopsis: The sensational biography of Princess Diana, written with her cooperation and now featuring exclusive new material to commemorate the 20th anniversary of her death.

     When Diana: Her True Story was first published in 1992, it forever changed the way the public viewed the British monarchy. Greeted initially with disbelief and ridicule, the #1 New York Times bestselling biography has become a unique literary classic, not just because of its explosive contents but also because of Diana’s intimate involvement in the publication. Never before had a senior royal spoken in such a raw, unfiltered way about her unhappy marriage, her relationship with the Queen, her extraordinary life inside the House of Windsor, her hopes, her fears, and her dreams. Now, twenty-five years on, biographer Andrew Morton has revisited the secret tapes he and the late princess made to reveal startling new insights into her life and mind. In this fully revised edition of his groundbreaking biography, Morton considers Diana’s legacy and her relevance to the modern royal family.

     An icon in life and a legend in death, Diana continues to fascinate. Diana: Her True Story in Her Own Words is the closest we will ever come to her autobiography.

      My Review: Princess Diana is one of the world’s most beloved princesses. Even twenty years after her death, she is still one of the world’s most prolific royals. Her legacy for humanitarian work still continues to fascinate and inspire millions. In this biography of Princess Diana, Mr. Morton gives an insight into this tragic but fascinating woman. He chronicles her tribulations as well as the legacy she leaves behind. He portrays Diana as a woman who felt the pressure of being royal and always sought to find her freedom and happiness.

    After reading Diana: Her True Story in Her Own Words, Diana seemed real and very human. Her life was not as glamorous as the photographs made her out to be. I could empathize with her on the problems she faced, such as her parent’s divorce, her struggles with bulimia, her reactions to Camilla, and her unhappy marriage with Charles. This biography also showed Diana’s flaws; she was idealistic, naive, rebellious, and temperamental. However, she was determined, hard-working, and a loving individual. She was a woman who battled with mental illness, the pressure of the press and the royal family, and with her unhappiness. Diana had very low-self-esteem. Throughout her life, her truest enemy was herself and she always strove to find confidence.

    Therefore, this biography shows a very intimate portrait of the “People’s Princess”. The biography is well-written. I was so enthralled by Princess Diana’s story that I read it in one sitting. I also liked how the author put together a collection of interviews that Diana had recorded. I loved that because it is like Diana’s autobiography and it gives us more of an insight into the princess. Therefore, I highly recommend Diana: Her True Story in Her Own Words. Mr. Morton not only shows Princess Diana as a complex individual, but also why Diana has captured the hearts of millions. You can see why Diana’s long-lasting legacy still carries on to this day.

Rating: 5 out of 5 stars

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