Skip to main content

Blog Tour: Emmy Nation: Undercover Suffragette by L. Davis Munro: A Book Review

Emmy Nation Undercover Suffragette by L. Davis Munro
Publication Date: 2015
Publisher: CreateSpace
Pages: 320
Genre: Historical Fiction
Source: This book was given to me by iReads Book Tours in exchange for an honest review.
Synopsis: Being an independent woman in 1913 London is certainly empowering, but Emmy Nation is tired of the inescapable damp seeping through her worn shoes and the hopeless grumblings of her stomach.

     When she receives an offer from Scotland Yard to boost her typist income by spying on the Women’s Social and Political Union (WSPU), Emmy jumps at the chance. But as she grows closer to the WSPU women the lines begin to blur, and when a painful part of her past resurfaces Emmy begins to question her choices.


​     How far are you willing to go to secure your equality?


     My Review: Emmy Nation works as a typewriter in the Scotland Yard. When the suffrage  movement is becoming very militant, the Scotland Yard wants Emmy to go undercover as a Suffragette to spy on their movement. Emmy jumps at this opportunity. She gets more pay and nicer clothes. However when she arrives at the Women’s Social and Political Union, she befriends a suffragette. As time goes by, Emmy soons becomes interested in the ideals’ of the suffrage movement. Soon, she must make a choice to truly be devoted to the cause.

     Emmy, at first, seems to be comfortable with her job as a typewriter. However, when she is given a better assignment she doesn’t hesitate to accept it. At first she is  happy to go undercover, for she thinks about the pay and the clothes. She is not really interested in their cause. Instead, she is afraid of the radical movement and thinks only about surviving through the marches of the suffrage movement. It is not until later that she actually thinks about the suffragettes’ cause. Soon, Emmy becomes a stronger and more mature person. We also get to see how intelligent Emmy is in the novel. She has to make hard choices and to do what is right. Therefore, Emmy is a likable character that audiences will root for.

    Overall, this book is about friendship, love, and choices. It is about a woman finding her own identity. I was intrigued with how the author portrayed the suffrage movement. These women were very admirable and they made many sacrifices so that women could have equal rights. I also liked the portrayal of the Pankhursts, the leaders of Women’s Social and Political Union. I had never heard of them until I read this book, but they seem like strong women. The writing is very engaging and it is fast-paced. The characters are complex and interesting. This novel leaves me excited to read the sequel. Emmy Nation is a great tribute to the women who have fought for their rights of equality.

Rating: 5 out of 5 stars

Buy the Book: Book Depository, and currently for 99 cents on Amazon

Book Trailer:




About The Author:



     L. Davis Munro holds a master’s degree with a focus on women’s suffrage theatre and works in theatre and dance. She currently lives in Toronto, Ontario, Canada, with her husband and her dog. Visit her on her website, Facebook, and Twitter.


Comments

  1. Thank you for the kind review! The Pankhurst's are a very interesting family, worth a bit of research to see all the bold, crazy, intelligent and intense things that they did as part of their fight.

    ReplyDelete
  2. Thanks! I'll definitely look them up!

    ReplyDelete

Post a Comment

Popular posts from this blog

The Magnificent Lives of Marjorie Post by Allison Pataki: A Book Review

The Magnificent Lives of Marjorie Post Author: Allison Pataki Genre: Historical Fiction Publisher: Ballantine Release Date: February 15, 2022 Pages: 381 Source: Netgalley/Publisher in exchange for an honest review. Synopsis: Mrs. Post, the President and First Lady are here to see you. . . . So begins another average evening for Marjorie Merriweather Post. Presidents have come and gone, but she has hosted them all. Growing up in the modest farmlands of Battle Creek, Michigan, Marjorie was inspired by a few simple rules: always think for yourself, never take success for granted, and work hard—even when deemed American royalty, even while covered in imperial diamonds. Marjorie had an insatiable drive to live and love and to give more than she got. From crawling through Moscow warehouses to rescue the Tsar’s treasures to outrunning the Nazis in London, from serving the homeless of the Great Depression to entertaining Roosevelts, Kennedys, and Hollywood’s biggest stars, Marjorie Merriweath

Before the Alamo by Florence Byham Weinberg: A Book Review

  Before the Alamo Author: Florence Byham Weinberg Genre: Historical Fiction Publisher: Maywood House Release Date: 2021 Pages: 299 Source: Netgalley/Publisher in exchange for an honest review. Synopsis: Emilia Altamirano, Tejana, half Native American, half Spanish, is the daughter of a Royalist officer who fought against Mexico's independence in the Battle of the Medina River. Growing up in Bexar de San Antonio, she becomes literate, is adopted as a ward of José Antonio Navarro, and acts as a page in the Ayuntamiento (City Council). She serves as a nurse in the Battle of the Alamo but survives to face an uncertain future.            My Review: Before the Alamo chronicles the events prior to the Battle of the Alamo from a tejana’s perspective, a Texan woman of Spanish descent. Emilia is the daughter of a wealthy Spaniard and a Native American slave. She becomes a ward to Jose Antonio Navarro, a Texas war hero. Jose teaches Emilia to read and write. Under his tutelage, she becomes

The Dark Queens: The Bloody Rivalry that Forged the Medieval World by Shelley Puhak: A Book Review

  The Dark Queens: The Bloody Rivalry that Forged the Medieval World Author: Shelley Puhak Genre: Nonfiction, History, Biography Publisher: Bloomsbury Release Date: February 22, 2022 Pages: 378 Source: Netgalley/Publisher in exchange for an honest review. Synopsis: The remarkable, little-known story of two trailblazing women in the Early Middle Ages who wielded immense power, only to be vilified for daring to rule.      Brunhild was a foreign princess, raised to be married off for the sake of alliance-building. Her sister-in-law Fredegund started out as a lowly palace slave. And yet-in sixth-century Merovingian France, where women were excluded from noble succession and royal politics was a blood sport-these two iron-willed strategists reigned over vast realms, changing the face of Europe.      The two queens commanded armies and negotiated with kings and popes. They formed coalitions and broke them, mothered children and lost them. They fought a decades-long civil war-against each ot