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Leaving Everything Most Loved (Maisie Dobbs #10) by Jacqueline Winspear: A Book Review

Leaving Everything Most Loved (Maisie Dobbs #10)
Author: Jacqueline Winspear
Genre: Historical Fiction, Mystery 
Publisher: HarperCollins
Release Date: 2013
Pages: 357
Source: This book was given to me by the publisher in exchange for an honest review.
Synopsis: In Leaving Everything Most Loved by New York Times bestselling author Jacqueline Winspear, Maisie Dobbs investigates the murder of Indian immigrants in London.

The year is 1933. Maisie Dobbs is contacted by an Indian gentleman who has come to England in the hopes of finding out who killed his sister two months ago. Scotland Yard failed to make any arrest in the case, and there is reason to believe they failed to conduct a thorough investigation. The case becomes even more challenging when another Indian woman is murdered just hours before a scheduled interview. Meanwhile, unfinished business from a previous case becomes a distraction, as does a new development in Maisie's personal life.

Bringing a crucial chapter in the life and times of Maisie Dobbs to a close, Leaving Everything Most Loved marks a pivotal moment in this outstanding mystery series.
  
     My Review: Maisie Dobbs is contemplating leaving England for India. Before she makes her decision and her arrangements, she must solve the death of an Indian woman. Usha Pramal’s body has been found in a canal, and her brother hires Maisie to solve the case because he is frustrated with how Usha’s death has been handled by the Scotland Yard. Maisie sets out to find the truth and to bring the killer to justice.

   This novel has an air of melancholy. Maisie is still grieving for the death of her mentor and wants to experience something new in her life. In the series, it takes Maisie on an unexpected journey because she is about to leave her home and her loved ones behind for a different change. Maisie is very depressed and she doesn’t have her usual charm. Leaving Behind Everything Most Loved focuses on Maisie’s decisions and spends very little time with her case. The case for Maisie seems like a nice distraction from her personal life. Maisie comes across as a woman in a crisis and very distant from those she loves. While this book tells us her motivations for wanting to leave, I found it to be very unconvincing, and I couldn’t believe she would leave all her family and friends behind. It seemed sudden and selfish.

    Overall, this book is about a woman who is about to make many life-changing decisions. There were very little appearances from many of the supporting characters. The novel read more like a filler because the mystery seemed to be an add-on. It was pushed to the side to make way for Maisie’s personal life. I was very disappointed in this mystery because I found it to be predictable, and I wanted to learn more about the victim. I like the aspect about Indian immigrants. However, I didn’t like how Maisie was portrayed in this novel. The pacing was slow. The writing was stilted and repetitive. Thus, I recommend this novel for those who have not read any of the Maisie Dobbs books and would happily await the next chapter in her life.  However, for fans of the series, you will be coming away disappointed and wished that Maisie did not leave many beloved characters behind.

Rating: 2½ out of 5 stars

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