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The Real Queen Charlotte: Inside the Bridgerton Court by Catherine Curzon: A Book Review

The Real Queen Charlotte: Inside the Bridgerton Court
Author: Catherine Curzon
Genre: Nonfiction, History, Biography
Publisher: Pen and Sword History
Release Date: 2022
Pages: 224
Source: Netgalley/Publisher in exchange for an honest review.

Synopsis: Known to millions as the imperious matriarch of Bridgerton’s court, Charlotte of Mecklenburg-Strelitz was still a teenager when she was chosen to be the bride of King George III. Shy, innocent, and sheltered, the orphaned princess and her youthful groom carried the hopes of a nation on their shoulders.


     The placid and unassuming young couple symbolized a new beginning, but soon those hopes began to sour. Charlotte and George’s marriage lasted for nearly 60 years and produced more than a dozen children, but it was beset by unrest at home, war in the colonies, and the king’s encroaching madness.


     As the royal couple battled against their critics, their political opponents, and sometimes even their own family, Charlotte learned what it really meant to be queen. Locked in a bitter struggle with her eldest son for the king’s future and with her daughters for their freedom, the timid young girl grew into an insular and domineering woman that few dared to cross.


     Shouldering the burden of family disputes, ambitious courtiers, and the care of the man she adored, Charlotte of Mecklenburg-Strelitz presided over one of the most tumultuous eras that the monarchy has ever seen. As tragic as it was glittering, this is the story of her extraordinary life.


     My Review: Queen Charlotte has recently become a popular icon for being featured in the highly acclaimed series, Bridgerton. There is a tv series based on her life coming out soon. Yet, this biography of Queen Charlotte proves that she was different from what the drama has portrayed her to be. Queen Charlotte was a German princess who married King George III. She initially had a good relationship, but When King George III started his descent into madness, Queen Charlotte’s happy married life was over.


Queen Charlotte was a woman who experienced many tragedies. She was a queen who was not interested in politics but was interested in solely caring for her family. She would grow to become a lonely, suspicious, and bitter woman. Yet, she remained dutiful to her husband. Queen Charlotte was also very charitable. There were times that I did not agree with her actions. She was very strict, especially with her daughters. Still, I found her to be a very tragic figure. She had to deal with her husband’s madness, and the pain knowing that her husband had already forgotten her.


Overall, this was a very comprehensive, though short, biography of Queen Charlotte. Because it is very concise, the biography does not go into much detail about her. Instead, it only highlights the major events of her life. Thus, I wished that it was longer because I think there is enough information to make a full book. Still, this is a good introduction to Queen Charlotte, and it allowed me to separate fact from fiction. I just hoped to look for a more in-depth biography on her. I recommend this for fans of The First Iron Lady, The Lost Queen, and The Georgian Princesses!


Rating: 3 out of 5 stars


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